Lower School Curriculum by Subject

Please find the course curriculum descriptions listed by subject for Lower School below. You can also view by grade.

English

List of 8 items.

  • Lower School Language Arts Overview

    Helping children develop effective communication skills is central to the Lower School experience. Teachers help students develop a love of literature, which is expanded upon through regular exercises in listening, reading, writing, spelling, and vocabulary. In grades K-2, we utilize the Orton-Gillingham Method of instruction for a systematic and structured approach to teaching literacy. This approach is a sequential phonics-based system that uses visual, auditory, and kinesthetic modalities. In addition, we utilize Reader’s Workshop, which includes shared, guided, and independent reading, and Writer’s Workshop to teach writing skills.

    Throughout the school year, students enjoy visits from well-known authors and illustrators who bring books to life for the Lower School community.

    Two literacy specialists (K-2 and 3-5) are available to support students as they develop skills in decoding, fluency, comprehension, and vocabulary.

    Please refer to each grade level for an in-depth look at the topics and skills each student learns in Language Arts.
  • Pre-Kindergarten Language Arts

    Reading
    As young children develop language skills, it is important that they are read to daily, developing listening and speaking skills in story discussion. The emphasis is upon developing a love of reading.
    Skills:
    • Listen and respond to read-aloud stories
    • Answer questions using evidence from the story
    • Make and share connections to stories
    • Retell stories
    • Identify letters and sounds
    • Build phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, comprehension, and fluency
    • Begin to use shared, guided, and independent reading, memory words, penmanship, and creative writing
    • Use numerous opportunities for speaking and listening
    • Develop fluency and accuracy with developmentally appropriate sight words
    Writing
    Children draw pictures to tell their stories.  As the year progresses, they begin to use print.  Activities for fine-motor development lead to finger strength and writing.
    Skills:
    • Dictate and illustrate a story
    • Begin to write sounds of words using developmental spelling
    • Write words from memory
    Spelling
    Children progress through predictable developmental spelling stages.
    Skills:
    • Pre-communicative spelling
    • Semi-phonetic spelling
    • Phonetic spelling
  • Kindergarten Language Arts

    Reading
    Children engage in activities that build phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, comprehension, and fluency. Teachers integrate reading, writing, speaking, spelling, and listening on a daily basis.
    Skills:
    • Build phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, comprehension, and fluency
    • Begin to use shared, guided, and independent reading, memory words, penmanship, and creative writing
    • Use numerous opportunities for speaking and listening
    • Begin exposure to various texts and genres through reading, read-alouds, and literature study
    • Develop fluency and accuracy with developmentally appropriate sight words

    Writing
    Children are exposed to both handwriting activities and opportunities for expressive writing.
    Skills:
    • Learn formation of capital and lowercase letters with kinesthetic reinforcement
    • Use daily writing routine to practice new letters taught as well as previously taught letters
    • Listen to dictation early in the year and progress to writing learned letters and words

    Spelling
    Spelling entails segmenting sounds. Children continue to progress through predictable developmental spelling stages.
    Skills:
    • Utilize Lexia, an online supplemental program, which reinforces and extends the spelling and reading programs
    • Work on segmenting sounds
    • Advance through developmental spelling stages of pre-communicative spelling, semi-phonetic spelling, phonetic spelling, transitional spelling, and correct spelling
  • 1st Grade Language Arts

    Reading
    Integrating reading, writing, speaking, spelling,and listening, we teach phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, comprehension, fluency, grammar and mechanics to help our students transition from learning to read to reading to learn.
    Skills:
    • Begin a lifelong passion for reading and learning
    • Understand different reading purposes: to improve skills, for enjoyment, to stimulate imagination, and to practice the five essential components of literacy acquisition as identified by research: phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension
    • Appreciate a wide variety of texts and genres through reading, read-alouds, and literature discussions
    Writing

    Writing is a key component for literacy development. It demonstrates understanding of important elements in reading, spelling, and handwriting, and can be a significant tool in identifying a student’s strengths and needs.
    Skills:
    • Write daily, including cross-curricular work, with a goal of producing 3-4 well-written sentences on one topic by year end
    • Learn about and practice the Writing Process
    • Use Six + 1 Traits (ideas, organization, voice, word choice, sentence fluency, conventions, and presentation) to enhance writing.
    • Write daily in a variety of genres, including personal narrative, fiction, letters, recipes, lists, observations, reflections, and poetry 
    Spelling
    • Learn heart/memory words that group words according to spelling and sound, patterns and sight
    • Utilize Lexia, an online supplementary program, which reinforces and extends the spelling and reading programs
  • 2nd Grade Language Arts

    Reading
    Students continue to expand the reading, writing, speaking, spelling, and listening aspects of Language Arts.

    Skills:
    • Develop the life-long passion for reading and learning
    • Comprehension: Text-to-Self and Text-to-Text connections, compare and contrast, draw and support conclusions, identify main idea and supporting details, determine cause and effect, understand characters and sequencing of events, understand descriptive language, summarizing, generate questions to determine main idea, and self-monitor for comprehension
    • Fluency: Read with natural phrasing, use typographical clues, observe punctuation, read with expression, read with appropriate stress, read with accuracy, read at an appropriate rate, and use proper pitch and volume
    • Expand Vocabulary:  Understand homonyms and synonyms, examine word use and effectiveness, understand words important to concept or text, understand idioms, figurative language, and onomatopoeia, use context clues, understand descriptive language and similes, classify and categorize words
       
    Writing:
    Writing Workshop incorporates mini-lessons, writing on both teacher-directed and student-selected topics, and regular sharing opportunities. On Fridays, the students write letters to their parents about their week and eagerly anticipate a written response.
    Skills:
    • Begin penmanship/ cursive, including: using implements, developing fine motor skills, copying letters, numbers, and words, forming upper and lower case letters, and leaving spaces between words. Use lines to guide letter and/or number placement
    • Implement the Writing Process: planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing
    • Implement 6+1 Traits: ideas, word choice, voice, fluency, organization, mechanics, and presentation
    • Write and learn the text structure of a variety of genres: lists, letters, personal narratives, retellings and innovations, poetry, and informational writing/non-fiction/research
    • Use technology to aid the writing process
    Spelling:
    Second Grade uses Lucy Calkins’ Units of Study Phonics program, which connects with reading work and supports students’ writing ventures.
    Skills:
    • Use invented spelling
    • Understand and apply: phonics, spelling rules, the six syllable types, sight vocabulary (heart/memory words).
    • Utilize Lexia, an online supplemental program, which reinforces and extends spelling and reading programs
  • 3rd Grade Language Arts

    Reading, writing, speaking, spelling, and listening are key components for literacy development. Students continue to develop a lifelong love for reading, writing and learning.
    Reading
    Active modeling of reading occurs daily.
    Skills:
    • Continue to "learn to read" as well as to develop the ability to "read to learn"
    • Read a variety of fiction and non-fiction texts
    • Study various genres in order to learn that reading is used for a variety of purposes
    • Use read-aloud books to learn comprehension skills, vocabulary, and to enhance awareness of self and othersComplete literature-based projects

    Writing
    Active modeling of writing occurs daily.
    Skills:
    • Write daily and across the curriculum in all subject areas
    • Learn and practice proper mechanics (capitalization, end punctuation, grammar, and usage) through the use of Daily Correct the Sentence curriculum
    • Learn and use cursive writing
    • Learn and practice the Writing Process (pre-writing, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing)
    • Write in a variety of genres, using the Six + 1 Traits and formats (ideas, organization, voice, word choice, sentence fluency, conventions, and presentation)
    • Choose a topic, research, and write informational text

    Spelling
    Third grade changes spelling texts to support reading and writing.
    Skills:
    • Utilize Orton Gillingham, Primary Spelling by Pattern, and Spellography curriculum
    • Learn more spelling patterns and rules, including prefixes and suffixes
    • Learn about homophones
    • Utilize Lexia, an online supplemental program, which reinforces and extends the spelling and reading programs
  • 4th Grade Language Arts

    Reading
    Reading, writing, speaking, and listening are key components for literacy development. Students continue to develop a lifelong love for reading, writing and learning. Active modeling of reading occurs daily.
    Skills:
    • Improve key comprehension skills
    • Learn about themselves as readers and clearly define who they are as readers in terms of preferences
    • Expand genre studies, including biography, historical fiction, poetry, mysteries, realistic fiction, nonfiction, and fantasy
    • Create and complete literature-based projects that include numerous author studies and an in-depth study of classics
    Writing
    Active modeling of writing occurs daily.
    Skills:
    • Write daily and across the curriculum in all subject areas
    • Write in a variety of genres and formats, from personal narrative to fiction, poetry, letters, and reports, using the Six + 1 Traits
    • Practice cursive writing
    • Utilize the elements of the Writing Workshop, including self-generated topics, using a consistent process, fostering independence, and working in authentic ways
    • Complete research projects that help refine writing skills
    • Understand that writing is thinking and is a key component for literacy development
    Spelling
    Students use Vocabulary Workshop by Sadlier.
    Skills:
    • Study high-use word list comprised of the most frequently used words in the English language
    • Utilize Orton Gillingham, How to Spell by Rudginsky and Haskell, and Quick-Word Handbook for Everyday Writers curriculum
    • Take weekly reviews and dictations to practice words, spelling, phonemic awareness, word attack, reading fluency, and vocabulary
    • Identify and study word patterns
    • Edit and proofread written work
  • 5th Grade Language Arts

    Reading
    Reading, writing, speaking, and listening are key components for literacy development. Students continue to develop a lifelong love for reading, writing and learning. Active modeling of reading occurs daily.
    Skills:
    • Read a variety of genres for pleasure and information
    • Comprehend characteristics and purposes of fiction, nonfiction, and expository texts
    • Use vocabulary strategies such as spotting context clues, and analyzing prefixes, suffixes, and roots
    • Use reading skills in research
    • Navigate the 21st Century digital world using media literacy skills and digital citizenship
    Writing
    Active modeling of writing occurs daily.
    Skills:
    • Write daily across the curriculum in all subject areas
    • Learn to craft organized, fluent writing with attention to purpose and audience
    • Apply writing process of drafting, editing, revision, and publishing work
    • Write in narrative, prose, and expository genres
    • Understand and implement conventions of spelling, punctuation, and grammar in written work
    • Plan, research, and write a capstone project and presentation
    Spelling
    Students use Vocabulary Workshop by Sadlier.
    Skills:
    • Utilize Orton Gillingham curriculum
    • Study spelling, morphology, definitions, new words, reading fluency, and vocabulary development

Math

List of 8 items.

  • Lower School Math Overview

    Lower School lays the foundation for mathematical reasoning and understanding. Our goal is to create confident problem solvers—children who are computationally fluent and solve problems accurately, flexibly, and efficiently. We support every student by creating a community of learners who collaborate and discover mathematical big ideas and concepts. Children build skills and strategies through intentional high-quality teaching that instills a mindset of curiosity, persistence, risk taking, and reflection. Throughout Lower School, children are exposed to the concepts and ideas of number and operations, geometry, data, measurement, and early algebra at increasing levels of complexity. A math specialist (K-5) is available to support students as they develop their number sense and multiple strategies to solve problems.
  • Pre-Kindergarten Math

    Pre-Kindergarten math involves early exposure to beginning mathematical concepts and thinking, as developmentally appropriate.
    Topics & Skills:
    • Counting and quantity
    • Patterning
    • Beginning to deconstruct numbers
    • Story problems
    • Problem solving
  • Kindergarten Math

    Kindergarten
    Counting is a central focus in Kindergarten. It is the basis for understanding the number system and for almost all math work in primary grades. The Kindergarten math program implements a spiraling approach to mathematical concepts and skills at increasing levels of complexity.
    Topics & Skills:
    The Number System: Counting in Kindergarten lays the foundation for understanding place value, the base-10 nature of our number system. Children count sets of increasing amounts during the year, beginning with sets of up to 10, then 15, and end the year fluently counting out sets of 20. They practice writing numbers to 20 and reciting rote counting sequence to 100.
    Addition and Subtraction: Counting activities build a bridge to the operations of addition and subtraction as children add or remove small amounts from sets and figure out “How many Now?” Work with Ten Frames explores the two addend combinations that make 10, and supports making sense of the teen numbers. Children represent and solve addition and subtraction story problems within 10.
    Measurement: Children’s work with length and weight begins with direct comparisons of objects. They discuss and make sense of important aspects of accurate measurement, such as which dimension to measure and how to line up objects for comparison. Children learn and become comfortable with the language that describes lengthlong, short, wide, high, and tall. They also become comfortable with language to describe weightheavy, heavier, light, and lighter.
    2D & 3D Geometry: Children learn to describe, identify and construct 2Dimensional and 3Dimensional shapes. They explore the idea that shapes can be combined to make other shapes.
    Data Analysis: Children gain experience with the many aspects of a data investigationcollecting, sorting, ordering, classifying, and describing are skills children learn to represent data.
  • 1st Grade Math

    First Graders extend their understanding of counting and the number sequence, building a strong foundation for their work with place value and the operations of addition and subtraction. The Grade 1 math program implements a spiraling approach to mathematical concepts and skills at increasing levels of complexity.
    Topics & Skills:
    The Number System: Children practice reading and writing numbers, and rote counting to 120. They develop accurate strategies for counting forwards and backwards by groups of 5 and 10. Children transition from understanding 10 as 10 ones to understanding 10 as 1 tena foundational idea in the base-10 number system.
    Addition and Subtraction: Children begin work with addition and subtraction within 20. Discussion focuses on strategies for efficiently adding and subtracting numbers using what children already know about combinations of 10. Understanding and solving a variety of story problems with unknowns in all positions a major focus of Grade 1.
    Measurement: Children develop an understanding of length as a stable and measurable dimension through experiences comparing objects. Children practice foundational skills for accurate linear measurement such as knowing when to start and stop measuring, understanding how units must be lined up in a straight line without gaps or overlaps. Understanding time and making sense of the clock as a measurement tool is another form of measurement children use in Grade 1.
    Geometry: Children observe, describe, and make comparisons of 2Dimensional and 3Dimensional shapes. They become more competent at determining which attributes of shapes are important as they describe, build, and draw 2D and 3D shapes. Composing and decomposing 2D and 3D shapes helps children learn about geometric relationships and structure.
    Fractions: As children learn to measure, they encounter lengths that are not a whole number of units long and times that are on the half hour. Fraction work in Grade 1 connects to these experiences. Children partition 2Dimensional shapes into halves and fourths. They discover that the more parts a shape is partitioned into, the smaller the parts.
    Data Analysis: Children collect, represent, describe, and interpret categorical data. They are introduced to several standard forms of representation, including picture graphs and horizontal and vertical tables. Guided by the question, “What do these data tell us about…” children discuss and compare representations focusing on quantitative characteristics of the data.
  • 2nd Grade Math

    Second Graders extend their understanding of addition and subtraction, focusing on developing efficient strategies for both operations. The Grade 2 math program implements a spiraling approach to mathematical concepts and skills at increasing levels of complexity.
    Topics & Skills:
    The Number System: Children learn to identify coins and their values and equivalencies. They understand that 3-digit numbers represent amounts of hundreds, tens, and ones. Children extend the rote counting sequence of numbers to 500, and then to 1,000.
    Addition and Subtraction: Children develop fluency of addition facts to 10 + 10, and the associated subtraction facts. They apply their understanding of place value, as well as strategies for adding and subtracting 2-digit numbers as they work with larger numbers.
    Foundations of Multiplication: Children build and model multiplicative situations that involve the accumulation of equal groups of 2 through 6, laying the foundation for the study of multiplication.
    Measurement: Children use linear units to measure objects. Beginning with non-standard units like craft sticks or cubes, children learn to measure with standard U.S. measurement units and metric units.
    Geometry: Children observe and describe defining attributes of 2Dimensional and 3Dimensional shapes. Attributes for 2D shapes include number and lengths of sides and the number of angles and vertices. Attributes for 3D shapes include the number and shapes of faces.
    Fractions: Work with fractions is directly related to geometry. Children partition geometric shapes into halves, thirds, and fourths, understanding equal parts of a whole.
    Data Analysis: Children participate in data investigations deciding how to collect, keep track of, organize, represent, and interpret their data. These data investigations engage children in modeling with mathematics. They use a variety of representations including picture graphs, Venn diagrams, bar graphs, cube towers, and line plots.
  • 3rd Grade Math

    Third Graders develop an understanding of the operations of multiplication and division, particularly focusing on multiplication and division involving equal groups. The Grade 3 math program implements a spiraling approach to mathematical concepts and skills at increasing levels of complexity.
    Topics & Skills:
    Addition and Subtraction: Children extend their understanding of place value and the number system by adding and subtracting fluently within 1,000. They use their deepening understanding of place value to build and refine strategies for fluently solving addition and subtraction problems with whole numbers.
    Multiplication and Division: Children create a variety of physical models to visualize and represent multiplicative relationships, key among these is the arraya rectangular arrangement of objects in equal rows and columns. They begin to develop fluency with multiplication facts to 10 x 10, using multiplication facts they know to help them learn facts they are still working on.
    Measurement: The main focus of Grade 3 measurement is understanding and finding perimeter and area using U.S. standard and metric units.
    Geometry: Children study the attributes of 2Dimensional shapes and how these attributes determine their classification. They compare the attributes of quadrilaterals, rectangles, rhombuses, and squares, recognizing that shapes in different categories may share attributes.
    Fractions: Children extend their understanding of the number system to include fractions. They learn to understand the meaning of fractions as equal parts of a whole. Work is done with fractions using an area model representing halves, thirds, fourths, sixths, and eighths. Children compare fractions, reasoning about fraction equivalencies.
    Data Analysis: Children collect, represent, describe, and interpret both categorical and numerical data. To make sensible statements about a categorical data set that has many different values, children group the data into categories that help them see the data as a whole. Line plots, bar graphs, and pictographs are used to help interpret data.
  • 4th Grade Math

    Fourth Graders focus on developing multiplication and division strategies for operating with larger numbers. The Grade 4 math program implements a spiraling approach to mathematical concepts and skills at increasing levels of complexity.
    Topics & Skills:
    Addition and Subtraction: Children extend their knowledge of the base-10 number system to 1,000,000, learning that any digit is 10 times as great as the same digit one place to its right. They read and write numbers in expanded notation, and also round numbers. Children practice and refine a variety of addition and subtraction strategies including the U.S. standard algorithms for addition and subtraction. Children are encouraged to look carefully at the numbers in a problem, thinking flexibly and choosing the most efficient strategy to solve the problem from a variety of strategies.
    Multiplication and Division: Children develop strategies for multiplying two 2-digit numbers and multiplying up to a 4-digit by a 1-digit number. Strategies for multiplication include breaking numbers apart by place value, keeping one factor whole and adjusting, and creating an equivalent problem. They solve division problems with up to 4-digit dividends, including quotients with remainders. Children find factors and multiples of numbers and identify prime and composite numbers.
    Measurement: Children work with linear, area, and angle measurement, as well as measurement conversions. Their understanding of area deepens as they find the area of different polygons using symmetry and non-standard units. Children learn that angles are measured in terms of a rotation that is part of a circular arc and are measured in degrees.
    Geometry: Children define polygons as closed shapes with straight lines and become familiar with their componentsline segments, points, vertices, and angles. They learn that polygons can be classified by their number of sides, and triangles can be classified by the size of their angles.
    Fractions and Decimals: Children increase their understanding of the meaning of rational numbers as they work with halves, thirds, fourths, fifths, sixths, eighths, twelfths, and hundredths. They are introduced to decimals and learn that tenths and hundredths can be written with both fraction and decimal notation.
    Analyzing Patterns and Rules: Children model mathematical relationships associated with two different contexts where two quantities are related in predictable ways. They learn to generate a number pattern that follows a given rule and analyze features of the pattern in order to solve problems.
    Data Analysis: Children model real-world situations with mathematics as they collect, represent, describe, and analyze data in order to compare two groups. Choosing the most important features that characterize a data set, children compare how the two sets are similar or different.
  • 5th Grade Math

    Fifth Graders consolidate their computational strategies for multiplication and division and can choose which strategy most efficiently solves a problem. Students use the order of operations to solve computation problems. The Grade 5 math program implements a spiraling approach to mathematical concepts and skills at increasing levels of complexity.

    Topics & Skills:
    • Multiplication & Division: Students consolidate computational strategies learned in 3rd and 4th grade to fluently solve multi-digit multiplication and division problems. All fifth graders should be able to use strategies based on the distributive property of multiplication over addition. Students learn the steps to the U.S. standard multiplication and division algorithms. They work on notating their solutions clearly and concisely.
    • Measurement & Data: A major focus of measurement involves the structure and volume of three-dimensional shapes, specifically rectangular prisms. Students learn that the volume of a solid is the space that the solid occupies, and it can be measured in cubic units. Students find the volume of a rectangular prism by discovering that volume is found by multiplying length times width times height.
    • Geometry: Students sort shapes based on attributes such as number of sides, side length, and angle size. By finding shapes that share certain attributes, students determine and name properties and categories of triangles and quadrilaterals. Students use coordinate graphs to represent the correspondence between two quantities. They learn that this correspondence is represented by a point on a coordinate grid.
    • Fractions & Decimals: Students work with fractions, making sense of the magnitude of the numbers and the operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. Students compare fractions and identify equivalent fractions and mixed numbers. Students represent, write, read, compare, add, and subtract decimals to thousandths. They use hundredth grids to compare decimals and see equivalencies among tenths, hundredths, and thousandths. Students add and subtract decimals.
    • Analyzing Patterns & Rules: Students use coordinate graphs, tables, and symbolic notation to model real-world mathematical situations. They analyze arithmetic patterns in tables and the shapes of the corresponding graphs to describe and compare situations. Students work with situations in which one quantity varies in relation to another. They use variables to notate equivalent expressions.

Science

List of 8 items.

  • Lower School Science Overview

    The Lower School Science program follows an internationally benchmarked science education program, Next Generation Science Standards. Taught by two full-time science specialists in two dedicated science labs, the program is designed to help students in Pre-Kindergarten through Fifth Grade begin to develop an understanding of the four core disciplinary areas: physical sciences; life sciences; earth and space sciences; and engineering/technology. In the earlier grades, students begin recognizing patterns and formulating answers to questions about the world around them. By the end of fifth grade, students are able to demonstrate grade-appropriate proficiency in gathering, describing, and using information about the natural and designed world. The performance expectations for the students in our Lower School include developing ideas and skills that will allow them to explain more complex phenomena in the four disciplines as they progress to Middle and Upper School.
    Please view each grade level to see the topics, scope, and sequence covered.
  • Pre-Kindergarten Science

    Pre-K Science is based on developmentally appropriate practices as outlined by the NAEYC (National Association for the Education of Young Children). Taking advantage of preschoolers' curiosity about their world, teachers focus on the uses and processes of science in children’s everyday lives.
    Topics & Skills:
    • Teachers provide interesting experiences and materials to convey key scientific concepts (e.g., weight, light, cause and effect).
    • Students practice elemental science skills (e.g., predicting, observing, classifying, hypothesizing, experimenting, communicating).
    • Children need both open and focused exploration. During open exploration, as a group they build a foundation of common experiences with phenomena and a common language for talking about what they are noticing.
    • Children are encouraged to notice changes, find patterns, and discover relationships.
    • Recording and documenting investigations is important to make processes visible and allow children to go back to the beginning of a change or see a pattern over time.
    Specific Topic: Worms
  • Kindergarten Science

    The Next Generation Science Standards performance expectations integrate three dimensions of science education: scientific and engineering practices, disciplinary core ideas, and crosscutting concepts. Students develop these abilities through studying the topics outlined below.
    Topics & Skills:
    Physical Science
    Materials in Our World
    • Observe and compare physical properties of different kinds of wood samples, using the senses
    • Observe and compare properties and structures of different kinds of paper and fabric
    • Observe how wood, paper, and fabric interact with water
    • Explore the technology of making wood products
    • Observe and describe how and where fabrics are used
    • Observe, describe, and mix earth materials with water to observe properties
    • Communicate observations made about different kinds of materials, orally and through drawings
    • Use knowledge of the properties of materials to create useful and/or aesthetic objects
     
    Life Science
    Animals Two by Two
    • Develop a growing curiosity and interest in the living world around us
    • Observe and describe the structures of a variety of common animals—fish, snails, redworms, isopods
    • Compare structures and behaviors of different pairs of animals
    • Observe interactions of animals with their surroundings
    • Handle animals carefully, and participate in the care and feeding of classroom animals
    • Communicate observations and comparisons
    • Acquire the vocabulary associated with the structure and behavior of animals.

    Specific Topics:
    Penguins
    (Classroom Enrichment Unit - Students research and present on one element of the topic)
     
    Oceans
    (Classroom Enrichment Unit - Students research and present on one element of the topic)
     
    Human Body
    (Classroom Enrichment Unit - Students research and present on one element of the topic)
  • 1st Grade Science

    First Grade science is designed to develop students' abilities to practice and understand scientific inquiry.
    Topics & Skills:

    Physical Science
    Properties
    • Define and describe properties of matter
    • Identify common properties, such as color, size, shape, weight, texture, and materials
    • Brief introduction to solids, liquids, gases
    • Use balances and other equipment to compare objects by weight, magnetic attraction, buoyancy, and material
    Properties of Air
    • Experience air as a material that takes up space and can be compressed into a smaller space
    • Observe the force of air pressure pushing on objects and materials
    • Observe and compare how moving air interacts with objects
    • Organize and communicate observations through drawing and writing
    • Acquire vocabulary associated with properties of air
    Life Science
    Tadpoles and Frogs
    • Develop a growing curiosity and interest in the living world around us
    • Develop a basic understanding of amphibians (vertebrates, water/land)
    • Observe and describe the structures of frogs
    • Observe frog life cycle (frog spawn, tadpole, front legs, back legs, pulmonary breathing, adult)
    • Observe interactions of animals with their habitat/surroundings
    • Communicate observations and comparisons
    • Acquire the vocabulary associated with the structure and behavior of frogs
  • 2nd Grade Science

    Second Grade science students attend class for the first time at Woody’s Pond. Throughout the year they learn about the ecosystem and the importance of color in our environment. Through various activities and experiments, the students make conclusions about scientific concepts and record information about weather, states of matter, and magnets in a modified lab report format. In the Spring, they observe and document the life cycles of the plants they grow from seeds and butterflies and moths that hatch from larvae.
    Topics & Skills:

    Physical Science
    States of Matter
    • Characteristics of three states of matter
    • Changing states of matter with a variable
     
    Magnets
    • Magnetic attraction
    • Magnetic force
    • Magnetic fields and Earth’s poles
    • Magnetic compass
     
    The Science of Color
    • Primary and secondary colors
    • Mixing of colors
    • Camouflage
     
    Life Science
    Woody's Pond Environment
    • Environmental etiquette
    • Bird species
    • Animal tracks
    • Pond species
    • Pond ecosystem
    • Trees
    Butterflies and Moths
    • Larvae body parts
    • Pupal stages
    • Camouflage and mimicry
    • Metamorphosis
    • Adult body parts
    • Life cycles
     
    Plants
    • Observation and data collection
    • Growth
    • Parts
     
    Earth Science
    Weather
    • Temperature
    • Wind
    • Clouds
    • Precipitation
    • Storm systems
  • 3rd Grade Science

    Third Grade begins with a study of Prairie Ecology, integrated with a Social Studies unit and overnight stay at the Plains Conservation Center.
    Topics & Skills:

    Physical Science
    Electricity and Circuits
    • Simple open and closed circuits; constructing parallel and series circuits
    • Factors, besides switches, that affect the flow of current
    • Design circuit testers to determine conductivity of certain solids and liquids; demonstrate resistance by comparing the bulb brightness produced by different wires
    • Create circuit puzzles
    • Depict electrical setups with circuit diagrams
    • Electric charge, electric current, electrical circuits, and relationship of electricity and magnetism; what electricians do
    • Key innovators: Thomas Alva Edison, Alexander Graham Bell, and Lewis Howard Latimer
    • Hydroelectric power; energy used by household appliances
     
    Design Thinking with Air-Powered Rockets
    • Collaborate to design a rocket using construction paper, masking tape, and 20 grams of clay to be launched with 45 lbs pf pressure from the PVC rocket launcher
    • Use Design Thinking
    • Record observations
    • Use measurement, including mass in grams and length in centimeters
     
    Life Science
    Prairie Ecology
    In conjunction with Plains Conservations Center Field Study:
    • Explore the ecosystem as an organizational unit of life on Earth
    • Explore role, structures, and behaviors of Colorado prairie organisms
    • Learn about interdependent relationships in ecosystems
    • Study organization for Matter and Energy Flow in organisms
  • 4th Grade Science

    Systems and analysis is a theme that is threaded throughout the curriculum for Fourth Grade science. Students begin with a study of bones and the skeletal system. Next, they discover what is involved in a system and how to analyze one using the scientific method. In various experiments, students explore germs and the circulatory system. They research and record information on space and the solar system and conclude the year with lessons in chemistry. Bird watching and data collection from November to April, in connection with Cornell University, support the study of ecology around Woody's Pond.
    Topics & Skills:

    Physical Science
    Scientific Method
    • Proper lab report format using Scientific Inquiry
    • Hypothesize, conduct, observe, analyze, and conclude experiments
    • Characteristics of a system
    • Variables
    Chemistry
    • Acids, Bases and Indicators; pH scale
    • Types and causes of chemical reactions
    • Types of chemical mixtures
     
    Life Science
    Skeletal System
    • Function of bones
    • Scientific names and location of 21 bones
    • Create and label life-size paper human skeleton
    • Comparison of bones of different species
     
    Circulatory System—Blood & Heart
    • Function and components of blood
    • Types and roles of blood vessels
    • Benefits of donating blood
    • Function of heart
    • Chambers of heart
    • Circulation of blood in heart
     
    Health and Wellness
    • Healthy Habits: nutrition, sleep, exercise, hygiene
    • Germs: detection and prevention, includes presentation to younger students
     
    Bird Watching at Woody's Pond
    • Methods for identification
    • Identify bird species
    • Count and record birds for Cornell Lab of Ornithology
     
    Earth Science
    Space and the Solar System
    • Lunar phases
    • Composition of Moon
    • Origin of the solar system
    • Planets and objects in space
    • History of space travel
  • 5th Grade Science

    Fifth Grade science begins with an exploration of natural and manmade energy. After an investigation of design and efficiency, students use the Design Thinking model to create an invention for a classmate. An examination of the physical brain and strategies for an effective brain follow. The health and wellness unit includes an introduction to the human reproductive system and the physical changes of puberty. To prepare for a week of experiential learning at Crow Canyon, students learn about archaeological concepts which are then reinforced on-site. Classroom experiments and a history of the missile are part of the study of rocketry, and students build and launch their own rockets. Throughout the year, students keep a journal on their iPads to record their reflections about the pond.
    Topics & Skills:

    Physical Science
    Energy
    • Volcanoes around the world and in Colorado
    • Eruption of Mt. St. Helens in 1980 and 1984
    • Types of man-made energy/natural energy
    • Energy transfer and transformation
    Inventions
    • Rube Goldberg
    • History of inventions
    • Design Thinking: brainstorm, design, development of prototype, and final model of product 
    Rocketry
    • History of rockets
    • Newton's Laws
    • Aerodynamics
    • Model rocket building
    Life Science
    Woody's Pond Journal
    • Observation, analysis, and data collection
    • Characteristics of the pond
    • Seasons
    • Record findings on Book Creator app on iPad
    • Food chains and food webs
    The Brain
    • Functions of the brain
    • Lobes of the brain
    • Neurons; neurotransmitters
    • Brain chemicals and synapses
    • Effect of music, movement, nutrition, and drugs on the brain
    • Memory 
    Health and Wellness
    • Healthy habits: nutrition, sleep, exercise, hygiene
    • Puberty
    • Male and female reproductive systems 
    Earth Science
    Crow Canyon—Archaeology
    • Archaeology
    • Research design
    • Excavation

Social Studies

List of 8 items.

  • Lower School Social Studies Overview

    The Lower School Social Studies program is designed and instructed so that students have an understanding as a community member that the world around them is shaped by events, culture, and geography, and influenced by perspective. The five subsets in the study of Social StudiesGeography, History, Culture, Economics, and Civicsare reflected in the content and skills taught and learned. Our ultimate goal is to develop informed young people with an awareness and understanding of the world so they can be responsible and contributing global citizens.
    Please look at each grade level to see the topics and skills we teach.
  • Pre-Kindergarten Social Studies

    Our littlest CA community members learn what it takes to be a part of a larger group. Students learn about communities, including the school community and the farm community. They learn how to be caring and kind community members. Students share family holidays and traditions.
    Topics & Skills:
    Community
    • Learn about communities and CA school community in particular
    • Learn classroom and campus rules
    • Identify people, roles, and jobs people have in a community
    • Learn how people around the world and at CA celebrate in similar and in different ways
    • Learn about what farmers grow, the food that we eat, and the many jobs on a farm
  • Kindergarten Social Studies

    In Kindergarten, students begin to see themselves in relationship to others, their families, their school, and their community. Students receive an introduction to geography, including basic map skills and basic map vocabulary, and discuss cultural traditions and holidays.
    Topics & Skills:

    Community
    • Identify how individuals are similar and different
    • Recognize and describe how families have both similar and different characteristics
    • Learn roles and responsibilities of being a good citizen, including respect for self, others and the environment
    • Do community service with the Salvation Army
    Geography
    • Learn early map skills, such as north, south, east, west and locating Colorado
  • 1st Grade Social Studies

    First Grade students learn to develop a supportive community and work to become a cooperative member of a variety of communities. In addition, the Social Studies Weekly curriculum introduces topics that increase their understanding of the Global Community in which they live. Themes include: Maps, Patriotism, Goods and Services, Landforms, and Rights and Responsibilities.  
    Topics & Skills:
    Community
    • What kinds of communities exist (urban, rural, suburban, etc.)
    • How do communities change?
    • How does one become a respectful and contributing member of a community? What makes a good citizen? What are citizens' rights and responsibilities?
    • How can one person make a difference in a community?
    • How do leaders help their communities?
    • What does Patriotism mean?
    Geography
    • What is geography and how do we use maps? (compass rose, map key, grid mapping, legends, etc.)
    • What is on a map? What are continents?
    • Landforms
    Economics & Environment
    • How do people use our environment?
    • How are goods made and transported?
    • What are services and who provides them?
  • 2nd Grade Social Studies

    The Second Grade Social Studies program uses the curriculum from Social Studies Weekly, a publication aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The curriculum teaches students about geography, American history and culture, the basic structure of our government, and the rights and responsibilities of being an American citizen. Teachers supplement the following topics with various readings and projects to further understanding.
    Topics & Skills:

    Geography
    • Using Maps and Globes (compass rose, measure and describe distance, using different types of maps)
    • Locating the United States
    • The continents and oceans
    American History and Culture
    • The American Flag
    • Pilgrims
    • North American Indians
    • U.S. explorers
    • Presidents
    • Patriots
    • Scientists, artists, and inventors
    • Dr. Martin Luther King and Civil Rights
    Government/Civics
    • Rights and responsibilities of citizens and elected officials
    • Why and how people become citizens
    • Why people form governments
    • Resources and choices
    • Families and trade
    • Goods and services
    • Money and markets
  • 3rd Grade Social Studies

    Grade Three students learn about the State of Colorado through field trips, readings, outside speakers, and numerous projects. They take a field trip to the Plains Conservation Center to learn firsthand about the history of the prairie and the people who lived on it. Students experience life in a teepee in a Cheyenne village, a day in a “soddy” homestead, and the preparation of historical meals. Students also begin their study of the history of the United States.
    Topics & Skills:

    Colorado History
    • Factors influencing settlement and migration
    • Family stories
    • Cultural celebrations, holidays & traditions
    • Colorado leaders
    • Colorado symbols
    • Plains Indians
    • Pioneer settlers (Ranchers, Farmers & Cowboys, Miners, Trappers & Traders, Mountain Men, Entrepreneurs)
    • Groups (Hispanos, African-Americans, Japanese-Americans)
    • Natural resources
    Early U.S. History
    • Geography
    • 13 colonies
    • Origins of slavery
    • Colonization and migration
    • Westward expansion
    • Traditions, monuments, national symbols
  • 4th Grade Social Studies

    In Fourth Grade, students learn about a variety of topics and eras in United States history. Through extensive use of classroom novels and picture book read-alouds, as well as field trips and long-term projects, students are introduced to four social studies units. The year concludes with an economics immersion activity, Mini-Society.
    Topics & Skills:

    The Revolutionary War
    • Causes of the war
    • Lifestyles in the colonies at the time
    • Important historical figures from the time and their impact on the era
    • Effects of war
    Civil Rights
    • Causes of the movement
    • Important historical figures from the time and their impact on the era
    • Effects of the movement
    Western Expansion
    • Reasons for moving West
    • Impact of geography on settlers
    • Interactions between culturespositive and negative
    • Technology and its impact on expansion
    US Geography
    • A study of U.S. National Parks with focus on geography

    Mini-Society (Economics):
    • Simulate a market economy in the classroom to teach scarcity, opportunity cost, supply/demand, inflation, profit/loss
    • Innovators, inventors, and entrepreneurs
  • 5th Grade Social Studies

    Fifth Grade students explore United States and world geography, culture, and history via the lens of migration and the study of the Ancestral Puebloans. Students practice note-taking skills while studying migration patterns through major historical world events. In these units, students analyze the impacts of migration on all affected parties, while also beginning to develop study skills used in summative assessments. In the study of archaeology and the Ancestral Puebloans, a unit which culminates with a weeklong trip to Crow Canyon Archaeological Center near Mesa Verde, students learn about the original history of the region in which they live. This unit also allows students to work with their hands and engage in real-life scenarios.
    To finish their Lower School careers, students undertake a Capstone Project called Voices of Change. They choose a world problem or question of significance to them, research it thoroughly, and, using the Design Thinking process, they present and explain their solutions to an audience of parents, teachers, and students in the Leach Center for the Performing Arts.

    Topics:
    Migration
    • Internal and external forms of migration
    • Push and pull factors of migration
    • Cultural Impacts
    • Societal Impacts
    • Units include the Dust Bowl, Transatlantic Slave Trade, and the Great Migration
    Ancestral Puebloan History
    • Study of archaeological methodology and terminology
    • Simulated excavations
    • Lifestyles during the Ancestral Puebloan time periods (Archaic, Basketmaker, Pueblo)
    • Geography of the Mesa Verde/Four Corners Region
    • Experiential education at the Crow Canyon Archaeological Center
    Capstone Project
    • Participate in Voices of Change, an independent research project and presentation based on an important world problem or question.

Spanish

List of 7 items.

  • Lower School Spanish Overview

    Lower School students study Spanish with two Spanish instructors (Pre-K-2 and 3-5). French is also offered in Middle School, and Mandarin Chinese is an additional language that may be studied in the Upper School. In the upper elementary grades, we use the Content-Enriched Foreign Language approach to help students communicate in Spanish. Students receive their instruction in Spanish and use their language skills on local field trips. Throughout their language study, students utilize the 6Cs in various projects.

    Please look at the grade level descriptions to find out more about the Lower School Spanish curriculum.
  • Kindergarten Spanish

    Students learn the cultural importance of using names, greetings, and courtesy expressions and phrases for daily-life situations in Spanish, and they learn how to use and apply them appropriately, along with the correct pronunciation and inflection. They are gradually introduced to new vocabulary, including numbers, colors, animals, and objects.
    Topics:
    • Greetings
    • Introductions
    • Phrases
    • Commands
    Skills:
    • Ability to carry on a conversation, using basic greetings and phrases
    • Ability to follow directions in Spanish
    • Awareness and usage of correct pronunciation
    • Assimilation and use of target vocabulary
  • 1st Grade Spanish

    Students learn the cultural importance of using names, greetings, and courtesy expressions and phrases for daily-life situations in Spanish, and they learn how to use and apply them appropriately, along with the correct pronunciation and inflection. They are gradually introduced to new vocabulary, including numbers, colors, animals, and objects.
    Topics:
    • Greetings
    • Introductions
    • Phrases
    • Commands
    Skills:
    • Ability to carry on a conversation, using basic greetings and phrases
    • Ability to follow directions in Spanish
    • Awareness and usage of correct pronunciation
    • Assimilation and use of target vocabulary
  • 2nd Grade Spanish

    Students learn the cultural importance of using names, greetings, and courtesy expressions and phrases for daily-life situations in Spanish, and they learn how to use and apply them appropriately, along with the correct pronunciation and inflection. They are gradually introduced to new vocabulary, including numbers, colors, animals, and objects.
    Topics:
    • Greetings
    • Introductions
    • Phrases
    • Commands
    Skills:
    • Ability to carry on a conversation, using basic greetings and phrases
    • Ability to follow directions in Spanish
    • Awareness and usage of correct pronunciation
    • Assimilation and use of target vocabulary
  • 3rd Grade Spanish

    We use the Content-Enriched Foreign Language approach to help students to communicate in their new language, understanding the content with the vocabulary. Some strategies we apply in our classes are:
    • Total Physical Response and Storytelling (TPRS) focuses on comprehensible input and makes it easy for students to internalize the vocabulary. Comprehensible input is language that is presented to the students in such a way that the student can understand without the need of translation.
    • Study units by themes using the Backward Design Model. Themes include:
      • Introductions and greetings, directions and commands, numbers and the alphabet, colors, days of the week, animals, parts of the body, food, places, and classroom objects; Spanish concepts of tener sed and tener hambre; ¿Cómo está? and the verbs tener, abrir, and cerrar
    • Phonemic Awareness to improve pronunciation, reading, and comprehension skills
    • Learning Centers in Listening, Reading, Writing, and Speaking. We treat learning as an active process to keep the students engaged with hands-on activities, where the student feels comfortable to take a risk, make mistakes, develop skills in problem-solving, and apply past knowledge to new situations and questioning in Spanish.
    • Increased vocabulary through singing songs
    • Exposure to the Latinx Community and Culture through classroom visits, holiday celebration videos, art projects, and field trips
    • Organic World Language (OWL) creates an environment where learners are intrinsically motivated to use Spanish and to participate and be part of the classroom community.
  • 4th Grade Spanish

    We use the Content-Enriched Foreign Language approach to help students to communicate in their new language, understanding the content with the vocabulary. Some strategies we apply in our classes are:
    • Total Physical Response and Storytelling (TPRS) focuses on comprehensible input and makes it easy for students to internalize the vocabulary. Comprehensible input is language that is presented to the students in such a way that the student can understand without the need of translation.
    • Study units by themes using the Backward Design Model. Themes include:
      • Introductions and greetings, directions and commands, numbers and the alphabet, colors, days of the week, animals, parts of the body, food, places, and classroom objects; Spanish concepts of tener sed and tener hambre; ¿Cómo está? and the verbs tener, abrir, and cerrar
    • Phonemic Awareness to improve pronunciation, reading, and comprehension skills
    • Learning Centers in Listening, Reading, Writing, and Speaking. We treat learning as an active process to keep the students engaged with hands-on activities, where the student feels comfortable to take a risk, make mistakes, develop skills in problem-solving, and apply past knowledge to new situations and questioning in Spanish.
    • Increased vocabulary through singing songs
    • Exposure to the Latino Community and Culture through classroom visits, holiday celebration videos, art projects, and field trips
    • Organic World Language (OWL) creates an environment where learners are intrinsically motivated to use Spanish and to participate and be part of the classroom community.
  • 5th Grade Spanish

    We use the Content-Enriched Foreign Language approach to help students to communicate in their new language, understanding the content with the vocabulary. Some strategies we apply in our classes are:
    • Total Physical Response and Storytelling (TPRS) focuses on comprehensible input and makes it easy for students to internalize the vocabulary. Comprehensible input is language that is presented to the students in such a way that the student can understand without the need of translation.
    • Study units by themes using the Backward Design Model. Themes include:
      • Introductions and greetings, directions and commands, numbers and the alphabet, colors, days of the week, animals, parts of the body, food, places, and classroom objects; Spanish concepts of tener sed and tener hambre; ¿Cómo está? and the verbs tener, abrir, and cerrar
    • Phonemic Awareness to improve pronunciation, reading, and comprehension skills
    • Learning Centers in Listening, Reading, Writing, and Speaking. We treat learning as an active process to keep the students engaged with hands-on activities, where the student feels comfortable to take a risk, make mistakes, develop skills in problem-solving, and apply past knowledge to new situations and questioning in Spanish.
    • Increased vocabulary through singing songs
    • Exposure to the Latino Community and Culture through classroom visits, holiday celebration videos, art projects, and field trips
    • Organic World Language (OWL) creates an environment where learners are intrinsically motivated to use Spanish and to participate and be part of the classroom community.

Computer Science/Engineering & Design

List of 8 items.

  • Lower School Computer Science/Engineering Design Overview

    The Lower School Computer Science/Engineering & Design and technology literacy/digital citizenship program is committed to providing students with the 21st century skills needed for future success and to promoting exploration in Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts/Design, and Math education and creation. Lower School students have ready access and exposure to technology tools for learning. Desktops, laptops, electronic whiteboards, and iPads are prevalent in classrooms, the library, science labs, and the Lower School iLab. The school's 1:1 iPad program begins in the Fifth Grade. Younger students have access to shared iPad sets in the classroom. Through targeted lessons, which are integrated with their regular classroom curricular units, students are introduced to a variety of technology programs, tools, apps, and skills.

    Students are challenged to utilize their knowledge to develop creative, relevant, well-researched projects and presentations. Students also learn practical technology skills, such as keyboarding, file sharing, and creating documents through a variety of apps and software programs. Students also learn about the importance of practicing responsible technology use through lessons in Digital Citizenship. 
     
    The iLab is a center in the Lower School that promotes hands-on, problem-based learning where students can construct ‘things’ and ideas. The iLab features MaKey MaKeys, an invention kit that turns everyday objects into touchpads that activate circuits or connect to the Internet. In addition, Robotics is an exploratory component of engineering and programming study in Science for Grades K-5. Students develop additional computer science skills through designing objects for 3D printing.
     
    Lower School students begin learning how to program with LEGO® WeDo and small toy-like robots that move and turn. From First Grade, students follow Code.org’s CS Fundamentals Course, which teaches programming concepts, computational thinking, digital citizenship, and interactive game and story development. In addition, students are invited to participate in the Dash and Dot Wonder League Robotics Competition, a national competition to program robots.
  • Pre-Kindergarten Computer Science/Engineering Design

    The Lower School Computer Science/Engineering Design Program (iLab, Library, Science, iPad program) provides resources that support the Lower School curriculum and is designed to promote exploration in Science, Technology, Engineering, Art/Design, and Math education and creation.

    Skills& Topics:
    • Orientation
    • Digital Citizenship: Introduction
    • Keyboard and device awareness
    • Basic navigation
    • Language Arts, Math, Community, Arts, Library support
  • Kindergarten Computer Science/Engineering Design

    The Lower School Computer Science/Engineering Design Program (iLab, Library, Science, iPad program) provides resources that support the Lower School curriculum and is designed to promote exploration in Science, Technology, Engineering, Art/Design, and Math education and creation.

    Skills & Topics:
    • Digital Citizenship: Online vs. real world community
    • Keyboard and device awareness
    • Basic Drawing program: Pixie
    • STEAM: Vocabulary
    • Basic navigation
    • Introduction to computer science and programming: Code Week
    • Language Arts, Math, Community, Arts, Library support
     
  • 1st Grade Computer Science/Engineering Design

    The Lower School Computer Science/Engineering Design Program (iLab, Library, Science, iPad program) provides resources that support the Lower School curriculum and is designed to promote exploration in Science, Technology, Engineering, Art/Design and Math education and creation.

    Skills & Topics:
    • Digital Citizenship: Basic search skills and rules to remain safe online while visiting web sites
    • Keyboard and device awareness
    • Word processing
    • STEAM: Vocabulary, experimentation and construction (KNEX)
    • Basic Navigation
    • File use and structure
    • Image manipulation
    • Video production
    • Spreadsheet functions and formatting
    • Language Arts, Math, Community, Arts, Library support
    • Introduction to computer science and programming utilizing basic graphic programming blocks and robotics (Lego Wedo, Scratch Jr.)

    Robotics (STEM) with Lego We-Do Robots
    • Simple Machines
    • Transmission of motion
    • Transfer of energy
    • Lever
    • Pulley
    • Gears
    • Compound gearing
    • Friction
    Technology
    • Program and create a working model
    • Interpret 2-D and 3-D illustrations and models
    • Compare natural systems with mechanical systems
    • Use feedback to adjust a programming system output
    • Apply principles of motion and other concepts of physical science
    Engineering
    • Build, program, and test models
    • Modify a model's behavior by changing the mechanical system or by adding a sensor to provide feedback
    Mathematics
    • Whole number relationships
    • Standard units
    • Estimation
    • Time in seconds and tenths of seconds
    • Use simple counting variables
    • Use numbers to represent sounds, displays, distance, tilt value, and other data
    • How ratio of gear teeth and pulley diameter affects speed
  • 2nd Grade Computer Science/Engineering Design

    The Lower School Computer Science/Engineering Design Program (iLab, Library, Science, iPad program) provides resources that support the Lower School curriculum and is designed to promote exploration in Science, Technology, Engineering, Art/Design and Math education and creation.

    Skills & Topics:
    • Digital Citizenship: Misleading advertising and types of online communication
    • Keyboard and device awareness
    • Word Processing
    • Basic Navigation
    • File use and structure
    • STEAM: Vocabulary, experimentation and construction (KNEX)
    • Image manipulation
    • Video production
    • Stop motion
    • Spreadsheet functions, formatting, and graphing to display data
    • Language Arts, Math, Social Studies, Arts, Library support
    • Computer science, basic programming and robotics (Lego, Wedo, Scratch Jr.)

    Robotics (STEM) with Lego We-Do Robots
    • Simple Machines
    • Transmission of motion
    • Transfer of energy
    • Lever
    • Pulley
    • Gears
    • Compound gearing
    • Friction
    Technology
    • Program and create a working model
    • Interpret 2D and 3D illustrations and models
    • Compare natural systems with mechanical systems
    • Use feedback to adjust a programming system output
    • Apply principles of motion and other concepts of physical science
    Engineering
    • Build, program, and test models
    • Modify a model's behavior by changing the mechanical system or by adding a sensor to provide feedback
    Mathematics
    • Whole number relationships
    • Standard units
    • Estimation
    • Time in seconds and tenths of seconds
    • Use simple counting variables
    • Use numbers to represent sounds, displays, distance, tilt value, and other data
    • How ratio of gear teeth and pulley diameter affects speed
  • 3rd Grade Computer Science/Engineering Design

    The Lower School Computer Science/Engineering Design Program (iLab, Library, Science, iPad program) provides resources that support the Lower School curriculum and is designed to promote exploration in Science, Technology, Engineering, Art/Design, and Math education and creation.

    Skills & Topics:
    • Digital Citizenship: Keyword searching and online safety
    • Word processing
    • Keyboarding–touch typing
    • Basic Navigation
    • File use and structure
    • Slide presentations
    • Podcast presentations
    • Image manipulation
    • Video production
    • Language Arts, Math, Social Studies, Library support
    • Computer science, basic programming, robotics, 3D modeling and 3D printing (Makey Makey, Scratch, Lego Mindstorms, Sketchup)
     
    Robotics (STEM) with Lego We-Do Robots
    • Simple Machines
    • Transmission of motion
    • Transfer of energy
    • Lever
    • Pulley
    • Gears
    • Compound gearing
    • Friction
    Technology
    • Program and create a working model
    • Interpret 2D and 3D illustrations and models
    • Compare natural systems with mechanical systems
    • Use feedback to adjust a programming system output
    • Apply principles of motion and other concepts of physical science
    Engineering
    • Build, program, and test models
    • Modify a model's behavior by changing the mechanical system or by adding a sensor to provide feedback
    Mathematics
    • Whole number relationships
    • Standard units
    • Estimation
    • Time in seconds and tenths of seconds
    • Use simple counting variables
    • Use numbers to represent sounds, displays, distance, tilt value, and other data
    • How ratio of gear teeth and pulley diameter affects speed
  • 4th Grade Computer Science/Engineering Design

    The Lower School Computer Science/Engineering Design Program (iLab, Library, Science, iPad program) provides resources that support the Lower School curriculum and is designed to promote exploration in Science, Technology, Engineering, Art/Design, and Math education and creation.

    Skills & Topics:
    • Digital Citizenship: Power of words and plagiarism, secure passwords, spam, photo manipulation
    • Word processing
    • Keyboarding–touch typing
    • Basic Navigation
    • File use and structure
    • Podcast presentations
    • Image manipulation
    • Spreadsheet functions, formatting, and graphing to display data
    • Language Arts, Math, Social Studies, Science, Library support
    • Computer science, basic programming, robotics, 3D modeling and 3D printing (Makey Makey, Scratch, Lego Mindstorms, Sketchup)
    Robotics (STEM) with Lego We-Do Robots
    • Simple Machines
    • Transmission of motion
    • Transfer of energy
    • Lever
    • Pulley
    • Gears
    • Compound gearing
    • Friction
    Technology
    • Program and create a working model
    • Interpret 2D and 3D illustrations and models
    • Compare natural systems with mechanical systems
    • Use feedback to adjust a programming system output
    • Apply principles of motion and other concepts of physical science
    Engineering
    • Build, program, and test models
    • Modify a model's behavior by changing the mechanical system or by adding a sensor to provide feedback
    Mathematics
    • Whole number relationships
    • Standard units
    • Estimation
    • Time in seconds and tenths of seconds
    • Use simple counting variables
    • Use numbers to represent sounds, displays, distance, tilt value, and other data
    • How ratio of gear teeth and pulley diameter affects speed

    Robotics (STEM) with Lego Ev3 Robots
    • Simple Machines
    • Transmission of motion
    • Transfer of energy
    • Lever
    • Pulley
    • Gears
    • Compound gearing
    • Friction
    Technology
    • Program and create a working model
    • Interpret 2D and 3D illustrations and models
    • Compare natural systems with mechanical systems
    • Use feedback to adjust a programming system output
    • Apply principles of motion and other concepts of physical science
    Engineering
    • Build, program, and test models
    • Modify a model's behavior by changing the mechanical system or by adding a sensor to provide feedback
    Mathematics
    • Whole number relationships
    • Standard units
    • Estimation
    • Time in seconds and tenths of seconds
    • Use simple counting variables
    • Use numbers to represent sounds, displays, distance, tilt value, and other data
    • How ratio of gear teeth and pulley diameter affects speed
    • Problem solving
    • Collect/graph data
    • Rotations, estimation, extrapolation, circumference, measuring distance and speed, slope, ratios
  • 5th Grade Computer Science/Engineering Design

    The Lower School Computer Science/Engineering Design Program (iLab, Library, Science, iPad program) provides resources that support the Lower School curriculum and is designed to promote exploration in Science, Technology, Engineering, Art/Design, and Math education and creation.

    Skills & Topics:
    • Digital Citizenship: Critical website evaluation, email use and etiquette, plagiarism, Internet vs real world friends, cyberbullying, presenter on Internet Safety
    • Keyboarding–touch typing (25wpm @ 90% accuracy)
    • Word processing
    • Image manipulation
    • Video production
    • Podcast presentations
    • Spreadsheet functions, formatting, and graphing to display data
    • One-to-One device use and responsibility
    • Cloud and workflow
    • Language Arts, Math, Science, Library support
    • Computer science, basic programming, robotics, 3D modeling and 3D printing (Makey Makey, Scratch, Lego Mindstorms, Sketchup)

    Robotics (STEM) with Lego Ev3 Robots
    • Simple Machines
    • Transmission of motion
    • Transfer of energy
    • Lever
    • Pulley
    • Gears
    • Compound gearing
    • Friction
    Technology
    • Program and create a working model
    • Interpret 2D and 3D illustrations and models
    • Compare natural systems with mechanical systems
    • Use feedback to adjust a programming system output
    • Apply principles of motion and other concepts of physical science
    Engineering
    • Build, program, and test models
    • Modify a model's behavior by changing the mechanical system or by adding a sensor to provide feedback
    Mathematics
    • Whole number relationships
    • Standard units
    • Estimation
    • Time in seconds and tenths of seconds
    • Use simple counting variables
    • Use numbers to represent sounds, displays, distance, tilt value, and other data
    • How ratio of gear teeth and pulley diameter affects speed
    • Problem solving
    • Collect/graph data
    • Rotations, estimation, extrapolation, circumference, measuring distance and speed, slope, ratios

Visual & Performing Arts

List of 8 items.

  • Lower School Art & Music Overview

    Beginning in the early grades, students are exposed to an enriched arts environment that includes music and the visual arts.

    The goal of the Lower School Visual Arts Curriculum is to honor each student as a unique artist, with their own individual creative voice to think, create, and innovate. We believe every student is an artist, and therefore, it is our honor to engage and nurture our students in this way. The Visual Arts program engages our young artists’ imaginations and enthusiasm through their senses to: envision, explore, reflect, imagine, collaborate, problem solve, design, and respond to the world with fresh eyes as they grow their creative voice, collaborative skills, and understanding of the world.

    Students are introduced to an expansive art curriculum that focuses on fostering creative expression, problem solving, and learning to use tools, materials, and artistic conventions. Using different techniques and media, every student explores: Critical & Design Thinking; Elements of Art & Design; the Creative Art Process & Play; Meaning Making; Self-Expression; Problem Solving & Collaboration; and Community Engagement & Exhibits.

    Beginning in Pre-K, children experience studio art projects in small groups to explore a rich and diverse palette of materials that range from: found objects from wood, clay, fiber, paint, and a variety of mark-making media. The children play, investigate, experiment, and express themselves as creative beings who are natural artists.

    Our K-5 classes in the Visual Arts attend classes in one of the campus art studios located in the magnificent Ponzio Arts Center. Students study with accomplished artists and learn skills in such diverse media and techniques as: painting, drawing, print making, clay, sculpture, sewing, felting, weaving, mixed media, digital media, animation, and more.

    Lower School Music is a place to sing, speak, dance, and play while learning the basic fundamentals of music. Our goal is to develop confident and competent musicians who take ownership of their learning and who feel empowered to take risks and discover their own strengths. Students explore music concepts through games and collaborative projects. They become thoughtful musicians by making music together as a class. Students are creatively involved in every project, making decisions and discussing with their peers about how performances should look and sound. Lower School Music at CA is an Orff-Schulwerk program. This is an approach to music education where the integration of music, dance and play are at work every day. Students apply what they have learned in culminating spring performances.

    Please see each grade level to examine our Visual Arts and Music program in detail and to see information about Private Music Instruction available at each level.
  • Pre-Kindergarten Art & Music

    Pre-Kindergarten Visual Art is a unique and enriching opportunity for our youngest students to engage in the arts through exploration, experimentation, and fun!

    Social skills, self-awareness, and self-confidence are reinforced through repetition of classroom behavior expectations, material management, and self-discipline.

    Elements of the arts are explored throughout the year in order to establish a strong foundation in art.
    Topics:
    • Color
    • Shape
    • Line
    • Texture
    Music:
    In Pre-Kindergarten, students have experiences designed to lay the foundation for their future music learning.
    Sing
    • sing songs
    Speak
    • tell stories
    Dance
    • explore the many sounds around them
    Play
    • play games
  • Kindergarten Art & Music

    Visual Art
    Art students learn to:
    • Play with and explore a variety of art media
    • Look closely and notice what they observe
    • Create work that has personal meaning Imagine possibilities, engage problems, and find solutions
    • Talk about and show their art work
    • Learn about other artists and cultures
    • Develop art techniques and skills
    Topics:
    • Mark Making with a variety of media
    • Expressive Line—Taking a Line for Walk
    • Observation and Gesture Drawing
    • Drawing Games and Imagination
    • Sketchbooks
    • The Big Draw Community Event
    • Color Mixing
    • Mixed Media
    • Collage
    • Sewing
    • Painting
    • Action Painting and Stamping with Toys
    • Patterns and Shapes
    Music
    Students come to music class to
    :

    Sing:
    • All of our voices - singing, speaking, whispering, shouting
    • High & Low sounds
    Speak:
    • Steady beat
    • Rhythmic speech
    • Fast & Slow
    Dance:
    • Spatial awareness
    • Stop & Go
    • Same & Different
    Play:
    • Instrument exploration
    • High & Low/Up & Down
    Private Music Lessons:

    Music lessons are available on the following instruments: Suzuki method Violin, Cello, Flute; traditional Piano; and Music Composition.
  • 1st Grade Art & Music

    Visual Art
    Art students learn to:
    • Play with and explore a variety of art media
    • Look closely and notice what they observe
    • Create work that has personal meaning
    • Imagine possibilities, engage problems, and find solutions
    • Talk about and show their art work
    • Learn about other artists and cultures
    • Develop art techniques and skills
    Topics:
    • Mark Making with a variety of media
    • Expressive LineTaking a Line for a Walk
    • Observation and Gesture Drawing
    • Sketchbooks
    • The Big Draw Community Event
    • Color Mixing
    • Mixed Media
    • Collage
    • Painting
    • Patterns, Shapes, and Design
    • Sculpture
    • Tooth Fairy
    Music
    Students come to music class to:

    Sing:
    • Beginning music notation skills
    • Solfege - Sol, Mi, & La
    Speak:
    • Rhythm reading
    • Notating the rhythm of the words
    • Speech canons
    Dance:
    • Circle & Partner dances
    • Body Shapes
    • Patterns
    Play:
    • Playing 2 and 3 note melodies
    • Playing a steady beat

    Private Music Lessons:

    Music lessons are available on the following instruments: Suzuki method Violin, Cello, Flute; traditional Piano; and Music Composition.
  • 2nd Grade Art & Music

    Visual Art
    Art students learn to:
    • Play with and explore a variety of art media
    • Look closely and notice what they observe
    • Create work that has personal meaning
    • Imagine possibilities, engage problems, and find solutions
    • Talk about and show their art work
    • Learn about other artists and cultures
    • Develop art techniques and skills
    Topics:
    • Mark Making with a variety of media
    • Expressive LineTaking a Line for a Walk
    • Observation and Gesture Drawing
    • Contour and Blind Contour Drawing
    • Sketchbooks
    • The Big Draw Community Event
    • Color Mixing
    • Mixed Media
    • Collage
    • Puppets and Interactive Art
    • Painting
    • Patterns and Shapes
    • Comics
    • Fiber Art and Weaving
    Music
    Students come to music class to:
     
    Sing:
    • Continuing to develop music literacy skills
    • Solfege - Do, Re, Mi, Sol, & La
    • Singing in canon
    Speak:
    • Rhythm reading
    • Notating the rhythm of the words
    • Layering rhythm patterns
    • Improvising short rhythm patterns
    Dance:
    • Circle dances
    • Traditional dances from around the world
    • Body Shapes - Levels, Same & Different
    • Expressive qualities - Sharp & Smooth
    Play:
    • Playing Pentatonic melodies
    • Improvising Pentatonic melodies
    • Layering more than one part together
    Private Music Lessons:

    Music lessons are available on the following instruments: Suzuki method Violin, Cello, Flute; traditional Piano; and Music Composition.
  • 3rd Grade Art & Music

    Visual Art
    Art students learn to:
    • Play with and explore a variety of art media
    • Look closely and notice what they observe
    • Create work that has personal meaning
    • Imagine possibilities, engage problems, and find solutions
    • Talk about and show their art work
    • Learn about other artists and cultures
    • Develop art techniques and skills
    Topics:
    • Mark Making with a variety of media
    • Observation and Gesture Drawing
    • Contour and Blind Contour Drawing
    • Sketchbooks
    • The Big Draw Community Event
    • Mixed Media and Collage
    • Community and Interactive Art
    • Painting
    • Fiber Art and Weaving
    • Sewing
    • Independent Choice Projects
    • Color
    • Line
    • Texture
    • Value
    • Space
    • Portraits, Landscapes, and Comics
    Music
    Students come to music class to:

    Sing:
    • Continuing to develop music literacy skills
    • Solfege - reading & singing melodies using the Pentatonic scale
    • Singing in canon
    Speak:
    • Rhythm reading
    • Notating rhythm of the words
    • Layering rhythm patterns
    • Improvising rhythm patterns
    Dance:
    • Folk dances from around the world
    • Body Shapes - Positive & Negative Space
    • Stationary vs. Travelling movements
    • Mirroring
    Play:
    • Playing Pentatonic melodies - including Pentatonic Modes
    • Improvising in Pentatonic Modes
    • Composing short melodies
    • Layering parts together
    Private Music Lessons:
    Music lessons are available on the following instruments: Suzuki method Violin, Cello, Flute; traditional Viola, Piano; and Music Composition.
  • 4th Grade Art & Music

    Visual Art
    Students explore many different art techniques and artists throughout history to create artwork that represents each student’s individual perspective, while focusing on the Studio Habits of Mind:

    Develop Craft: Refine and improve technical skill and craftsmanship
    Engage & Persist: Focus, problem solve, and persist through new experiences
    Envision: Brainstorm and generate unique ideas
    Express: Design and communicate a personal perspective
    Observe: Look carefully at the world around them to inspire creativity
    Stretch & Explore: Experiment, ask questions, & take risks in their work
    Understand the Art World: Discover historical and contemporary artists
    Reflect: Use art vocabulary to discuss students’ artwork and concepts

    Music
    Students come to music class to:
    Sing:
    • Continuing to develop music literacy skills
    • Solfege – reading & singing melodies using the Pentatonic scale
    • Singing in canon
    Speak:
    • Rhythm reading
    • Notating the rhythm of the words
    • Layering complex rhythm patterns
    • Improvising rhythm patterns in different meters
    Dance:
    • Folk dances from around the world
    • Stationary vs. Travelling movements
    • Mirroring & Shadowing
    • Play:
    • Playing Pentatonic & Hexatonic melodies
    • Improvising melodies using different scales
    • Composing short melodies
    • Layering parts together
    • Transposing the Pentatonic Scale
    • Beginning recorder
    Private Music Lessons:
    Music lessons are available on the following instruments: Suzuki method flute; Suzuki/traditional method Violin, Viola, Cello; traditional Piano, Clarinet, Saxophone; String Orchestra; Classical Guitar; and Music Composition.
  • 5th Grade Art & Music

    Visual Art
    Students explore many different art techniques and artists throughout history to create artwork that represents each student’s individual perspective, while focusing on the Studio Habits of Mind:

    Develop Craft: Refine and improve technical skill and craftsmanship
    Engage & Persist: Focus, problem solve, and persist through new experiences
    Envision: Brainstorm and generate unique ideas
    Express: Design and communicate a personal perspective
    Observe: Look carefully at the world around them to inspire creativity
    Stretch & Explore: Experiment, ask questions, & take risks in their work
    Understand the Art World: Discover historical and contemporary artists
    Reflect: Use art vocabulary to discuss students’ artwork and concepts

    Music
    Students come to music class to:

    Sing:
    • Continuing to develop music literacy skills
    • Solfege – reading & singing melodies using Modal Scales
    • Singing in canon
    • Singing in two parts
    Speak:
    • Rhythm reading
    • Notating the rhythm of the words
    • Layering rhythm patterns
    • Improvising rhythm patterns
    • Experiencing changing meter
    Dance:
    • Folk dances from around the world
    • Expressive qualities – Strong vs. Light
    • Stationary vs. Travelling movements
    • Mirroring & Shadowing
    Play:
    • Playing melodies in various Modal Scales
    • Improvising in various Modal Scales
    • Composing & notating melodies
    • Layering many different parts together
    Private Music Lessons:
    Music lessons are available on the following instruments: Suzuki method flute; Suzuki/traditional method Violin, Viola, Cello; traditional Piano, Clarinet, Saxophone, Trumpet, Trombone; String Orchestra; Classical Guitar; and Music Composition.

Athletics/Physical Education

List of 8 items.

  • Lower School Physical Education & Kinesiology Overview

    Physical Education/Kinesiology is an important area of the curriculum that is sensitive to the characteristics, interests, and needs of students. It is a broad-based program, focusing on a multitude of success-oriented activities that increase the likelihood that our students will become lifelong participants in physical activity. The Lower School program emphasizes motor development and lays the important groundwork for learning numerous skills that play a key role in language acquisition and vision development. Emphasis in all grades is on:
    • Cooperation
    • Integrity
    • Respect
    • Self-Discipline
    • Goal-Setting & Intrinsic Motivation
    Current practices and directions in physical education/kinesiology have taken on a new and exciting emphasis, with the ultimate goal of influencing physical activity in all students. Every child works to attain an above-satisfactory motor development level. In addition, knowledge of the body, combined with learning skills that will promote health-related activity, are essential in a sound physical education/kinesiology program. Emphasizing motor development, along with skill content and quality instruction, provides the building blocks for our Lower School children and gives them the opportunity to become truly "physically educated." Physical education/kinesiology is an innovation lab where children explore, meet success and failure, and learn about their capabilities.
    Goals:
    • To provide an environment that enhances the development of desirable social standards and ethical concepts
    • To motivate students to seek participation in and derive enjoyment from wholesome recreation and physical activity during their leisure time
    • To provide the structure that allows each child to become competent in management of the body along with a variety of physical skills
    • To acquire personal values from the physical education/kinesiology experience that encourage a full, productive, active life
    • To develop a desirable self-concept through relevant physical education/kinesiology experiences
    • To attain experience and competence in skills, games, and fitness activities relevant to a personal level of competence
    • To provide every child the opportunity to develop and maintain a level of physical fitness commensurate with a healthy lifestyle
    • To promote and foster a lifelong love for physical activity and create lasting growth in physical skills and fitness
    Signature Programs

    CA's Swimming Program: At the beginning of each school year and at the end, students in Kindergarten through Grade 5 participate in a variety of swimming challenges and activities designed to teach students how to be confident, independent, and adventurous young swimmers. PE instructors go in the water with students to teach stroke development and technique, while also reinforcing water safety and awareness of other swimmers.

    Giant Relay Day: All students are invited to take part in CA's long-standing tradition of Giant Relay Day! The PE instructors offer a Field Day with varied athletic activities and challenges for students in Grades Pre-K through 5. After an all-school picnic lunch, Middle and Upper School students participate in hotly contested divisional relay races on campus prior to the official Giant Relay, which pits CA seniors, faculty, alumni, and parents against one another in a race throughout CA's beautiful campus.

    Please see each grade level for specific P.E/Kinesiology activities offered.
  • Pre-Kindergarten Physical Education & Kinesiology

    The P.E./Kinesiology program provides a variety of activities to develop skills and fitness. In Pre-K through Grade 2, the program takes a movement-oriented approach. Students work through a series of athletic activities designed to challenge them as individuals and as a group, while reinforcing both gross and fine motor skill development, teamwork, and age-appropriate problem solving.

    Activities:
    • Large group games
    • Swimming in CA outdoor pool
    • Listening & following direction relays
    • Throwing, catching, dodging, striking, kicking, punting, dribbling, drop kick
    • Jump rope, hoops, rings, balancing
    • Tag games
    • Scooters
    • Parachute
    • Basketball skills
    • Floor hockey
    • Bowling
    • Newcomb: lead-up game for volleyball
    • Kickball
    • Indo boards
    • Stations
    • Obstacle course
    • Batting tees
    • Balls and paddles/scoops
    • Equipment Locker: Creative play



  • Kindergarten Physical Education & Kinesiology

    The P.E./Kinesiology program provides a variety of activities to develop skills and fitness. In Pre-K through Grade 2, the program takes a movement-oriented approach. Students work through a series of athletic activities designed to challenge them as individuals and as a group, while reinforcing both gross and fine motor skill development, teamwork, and age-appropriate problem solving.

    Activities:
    • Large group games
    • Swimming in CA outdoor pool
    • Listening & following direction relays
    • Throwing, catching, dodging, striking, kicking, punting, dribbling, drop kick
    • Jump rope, hoops, rings, balancing
    • Tag games
    • Scooters
    • Parachute
    • Basketball skills
    • Floor hockey
    • Bowling
    • Newcomb: lead-up game for volleyball
    • Kickball
    • Indo boards
    • Stations
    • Obstacle course
    • Batting tees
    • Balls and paddles/scoops
    • Equipment Locker: Creative play
  • 1st Grade Physical Education & Kinesiology

    The P.E./Kinesiology program provides a variety of activities to develop skills and fitness. In Pre-K through Grade 2, the program takes a movement-oriented approach. Students work through a series of athletic activities designed to challenge them as individuals and as a group, while reinforcing both gross and fine motor skill development, teamwork, and age-appropriate problem solving.

    Activities:
    • Large group games
    • Swimming in CA outdoor pool
    • Listening & following direction relays
    • Throwing, catching, dodging, striking, kicking, punting, dribbling, drop kick
    • Jump rope, hoops, rings, balancing
    • Tag games
    • Scooters
    • Parachute
    • Basketball skills
    • Floor hockey
    • Bowling
    • Newcomb: lead-up game for volleyball
    • Kickball
    • Indo boards
    • Stations
    • Obstacle course
    • Batting tees
    • Balls and paddles/scoops
    • Equipment Locker: Creative play
  • 2nd Grade Physical Education & Kinesiology

    The P.E./Kinesiology program provides a variety of activities to develop skills and fitness. In Pre-K through Grade 2, the program takes a movement-oriented approach. Students work through a series of athletic activities designed to challenge them as individuals and as a group, while reinforcing both gross and fine motor skill development, teamwork, and age-appropriate problem solving.

    Activities:
    • Large group games
    • Swimming in CA outdoor pool
    • Listening & following direction relays
    • Throwing, catching, dodging, striking, kicking, punting, dribbling, drop kick
    • Jump rope, hoops, rings, balancing
    • Tag games
    • Scooters
    • Parachute
    • Basketball skills
    • Floor hockey
    • Bowling
    • Newcomb: lead-up game for volleyball
    • Kickball
    • Indo boards
    • Stations
    • Obstacle course
    • Batting tees
    • Balls and paddles/scoops
    • Equipment Locker: Creative play
  • 3rd Grade Physical Education & Kinesiology

    Students in grades 3-5 concentrate more on the development of convergent skills, such as sport-specific skills and fitness activities.
    Activities:
    • Expectations and explanation of rules
    • Large group games
    • Team building activities
    • Soccer
    • Rugby
    • Volleyball
    • Tennis
    • Basketball
    • Floor hockey
    • Bowling
    • Speed soccer
    • Futsol
    • Badminton
    • Ultimate Frisbee
    • Bouldering
    • Indo boards
    • Team handball
    • Pickle ball
    • Kickball
    • Indoor lacrosse
    • Golf
    • Land paddling
    • Swimming in CA outdoor pool
  • 4th Grade Physical Education & Kinesiology

    Students in grades 3-5 concentrate more on the development of convergent skills, such as sport-specific skills and fitness activities.
    Activities:
    • Expectations and explanation of rules
    • Large group games
    • Team building activities
    • Soccer
    • Rugby
    • Volleyball
    • Tennis
    • Basketball
    • Floor hockey
    • Bowling
    • Speed soccer
    • Futsol
    • Badminton
    • Ultimate Frisbee
    • Bouldering
    • Indo boards
    • Team handball
    • Pickle ball
    • Kickball
    • Indoor lacrosse
    • Golf
    • Land paddling
    • Swimming in CA outdoor pool
  • 5th Grade Physical Education & Kinesiology

    Students in grades 3-5 concentrate more on the development of convergent skills, such as sport-specific skills and fitness activities.
    Activities:
    • Expectations and explanation of rules
    • Large group games
    • Team building activities
    • Soccer
    • Rugby
    • Volleyball
    • Tennis
    • Basketball
    • Floor hockey
    • Bowling
    • Speed soccer
    • Futsol
    • Badminton
    • Ultimate Frisbee
    • Bouldering
    • Indo boards
    • Team handball
    • Pickle ball
    • Kickball
    • Indoor lacrosse
    • Golf
    • Land paddling
    • Swimming in CA outdoor pool

Experiential Education

List of 7 items.

  • Lower School Experiential Education Overview

    Experiential Education enriches learning by taking students outside the classroom. It provides a context for classroom learning and fosters multisensory engagement that leads to connections and understanding. Experiential Education at CA includes outdoor education, service learning, class retreats, field studies, and global travel and exchange. The focus of the experiential education curriculum includes environmental education, outdoor skills, leadership development, and cross-cultural understanding. The core principles are: the primacy of self-discovery; curiosity about the world; responsibility for learning; struggle is imperative; respect for the natural world; and solitude and reflection.

    Please look at individual grade levels to see which opportunities are available to those students. The activities listed are a sample of both curricular and optional Experiential Education offerings.
  • Kindergarten Experiential Education

    The following experiential opportunities are available to students in Kindergarten.
    On-Campus Camping (optional)
    This introduction to tent camping takes place near Woody's Pond on the CA Baseball Field. At least one parent is required to attend with each child. Students will learn to set up a tent, cook a simple meal on an open fire, and sing some campfire songs.
    Skills & Topics:
    • Build community
    • Try new things
    • Set up a tent
    • Sleep outside
    • Principles of fire-building
    Carson Nature Center (optional)
    Skills & Topics:
    • Identify animal tracks
    • Learn about fox, rabbit, and bird habitats (where they live, what they eat, how they survive)
    • Observe animal behavior
    • Foster curiosity
    Lair O' the Bear Hiking (optional)
    Skills & Topics:
    • Nature appreciation
    • Stream habitat
    • Learning about what gear to take on a hike
    • Exercise in the great outdoors
  • 1st Grade Experiential Education

    The following opportunities are available to students in Grade One.
    On-Campus Camping (optional)
    This introduction to tent camping takes place near Woody's Pond on the CA Baseball Field. At least one parent is required to attend with each child. Students will learn to set up a tent, cook a simple meal on an open fire, and sing some campfire songs.
    Skills & Topics:
    • Build community
    • Try new things
    • Set up a tent
    • Sleep outside
    • Principles of fire-building
    Carson Nature Center (optional)
    Skills & Topics:
    • Identify animal tracks
    • Learn about fox, rabbit, and bird habitats (where they live, what they eat, how they survive)
    • Observe animal behavior
    • Foster curiosity
    Lair O' the Bear Hiking (optional)
    Skills & Topics:
    • Nature appreciation
    • Stream habitat
    • Learning about what gear to take on a hike
    • Exercise in the great outdoors
  • 2nd Grade Experiential Education

    The following experiential opportunities are available to students in Grade Two.

    On-Campus Camping (optional)
    This introduction to tent camping takes place near Woody's Pond on the CA Baseball Field. At least one parent is required to attend with each child. Students will learn to set up a tent, cook a simple meal on an open fire, and sing some campfire songs.
    Skills & Topics:
    • Build community
    • Try new things
    • Set up a tent
    • Sleep outside
    • Principles of fire-building
    Carson Nature Center (optional)
    Skills & Topics:
    • Identify animal tracks
    • Learn about fox, rabbit, and bird habitats (where they live, what they eat, how they survive)
    • Observe animal behavior
    • Foster curiosity
    Lair O' the Bear Hiking (optional)
    Skills & Topics:
    • Nature appreciation
    • Stream habitat
    • Learning about what gear to take on a hike
    • Exercise in the great outdoors
  • 3rd Grade Experiential Education

    The following opportunities are available to students in Grade Three:
    Plains Conservation Center (curricular)
    Skills & Topics:
    • Gain appreciation for an endangered ecosystem
    • Explore the plants, mammals, insects, reptiles, and birds that occupy the plains
    • Explore the Colorado prairie organisms
    • Understand the symbiotic relationship between the Cheyenne and plains ecosystem
    Camping near Golden Gate Canyon State Park (optional)
    This is an introductory camping trip at a campground with picnic tables, pit toilets, and access to hiking trails. Students grill hot dogs over an open fire and finish the evening with s'mores.
    Skills & Topics:
    • Learn to select an ideal campsite
    • Learn minimum impact camping techniques
    • Introduce Leave No Trace Principles
    • Explore local trails
    • Wildlife awareness
    • Flower identification
    • Prepare food and cook over a campfire
    Rock/Gym Climbing (optional)
    Earth Treks is a world-class climbing gym in Englewood. The gym offers hundreds of roped climbs and bouldering. The trained staff at Earth Treks belay students and play climbing games to improve movement and skills.
    Skills & Topics:
    • Face fears and perceived limitations
    • Create community among 3rd–5th Graders
    • Understand fundamentals of climbing movement
    • Introduce climbing equipment (harnesses, ropes, shoes, belay devices, and carabiners)
  • 4th Grade Experiential Education

    The following opportunities are available to students in Grade Four.
    Mt. Falcon Hike (curricular)
    Skills & Topics:
    • Learn about the failed project to create the “Summer White House”
    • Learn the role of fires in a healthy forest
    • Learn map reading (cardinal directions, colors, scale, and topography)
    • Build class cohesion through shared experience
    • Identify the predominant rock types and mineral content
    Camping near Golden Gate Canyon State Park (optional)
    Skills & Topics:
    • Learn to select an ideal campsite
    • Learn minimum impact camping techniques
    • Introduce Leave No Trace Principles
    • Explore local trails
    • Wildlife awareness
    • Flower identification
    • Prepare food and cook over a campfire
    Rock/Gym Climbing (optional)
    Skills & Topics:
    • Face fears and perceived limitations
    • Create community among 3rd – 5th Graders
    • Understand fundamentals of climbing movement
    • Introduce climbing equipment (harnesses, ropes, shoes, belay devices and carabiners)
     
    Tennessee Pass Yurt Trip (optional)
    Skills & Topics:
    • Snowshoeing
    • Backcountry skills
    • Winter travel and safety skills
  • 5th Grade Experiential Education

    Scotland Exchange (4-6 students per year; optional)
    Each Fall, up to six CA students travel to Scotland and participate in a home-stay program for three weeks. The following Spring, students from those same families become part of our CA community for three weeks. Students visiting Edinburgh attend the school, visit historical sites, and have the experience of living in a family with another Fifth Grader whose life they share.
    Skills & Topics:
    • Gain independence and confidence through a three-week trip away from home
    • Compare and contrast the cultural and educational differences between Colorado and Scotland
    • Experience family life in Scotland through a homestay
    • Share new cultural insights with classmates
    • Host Scottish students on CA’s campus to provide a varying perspective during class discussions
    Crow Canyon Archaeological Center (curricular)
    Skills & Topics:
    • Simulate an archaeological dig for artifacts
    • Explore Ancestral Puebloan ruins
    • Discover adaptations employed by Ancestral Puebloans to thrive in an inhospitable environment
    • Gain an appreciation for religious traditions of the Ancestral Puebloans and their craftsmanship regarding pottery, tools, and building construction
    • Foster responsibility by assigning students roles (cook, cleaners, leaders-of-the-day, etc.)
    • Nurture curiosity through guided activities that promote investigation
    Camping near Golden Gate Canyon State Park (optional)
    Skills & Topics:
    • Learn to select an ideal campsite
    • Learn minimum impact camping techniques
    • Introduce Leave No Trace Principles
    • Explore local trails
    • Wildlife awareness
    • Flower identification
    • Prepare food and cook over a campfire
     
    Rock/Gym Climbing (optional)
    Skills & Topics:
    • Face fears and perceived limitations
    • Create community among 3rd–5th Graders
    • Understand fundamentals of climbing movement
    • Introduce climbing equipment (harnesses, ropes, shoes, belay devices, and carabiners)
    Tennessee Pass Yurt Trip (optional)
    Skills & Topics:
    • Snowshoeing
    • Backcountry skills
    • Winter travel and safety skills

Library & Research

List of 8 items.

  • Lower School Library & Research Overview

    The Lower School Library provides resources that support the Lower School curriculum. Library services are also designed to encourage a passion for reading in each and every student. Students are allowed to check out books with their own library cards. In Pre-K and Kindergarten, students may select one book per week. In Grades 1-5, students may check out a total of their grade plus one book. Students have library time each week and take part in lessons related to class curriculum topics with additional times to check out books for pleasure reading.
    Please see each grade level for the topics and skills each student learns during library sessions.
  • Pre-Kindergarten Library

    Pre-K
    The Lower School Library provides resources that support the Lower School curriculum. Library services are also designed to encourage a passion for reading in each and every student.
    Lesson Topics & Skills:
    • Orientation
    • Library citizenship
    • Book care
    • Literature appreciation/response
    • ABCs and letter recognition
    • Authors and illustrators
    • Self-selection of appropriate materials
    • Library group awareness
  • Kindergarten Library

    The Lower School Library provides resources that support the Lower School curriculum. Library services are also designed to encourage a passion for reading in each and every student.
    Lesson Topics & Skills:
    • Orientation
    • Library citizenship
    • Book care
    • Literature appreciation/response
    • ABCs and letter recognition
    • Authors and illustrators
    • Self-selection of appropriate materials
    • Alphabetizing
    • Library group awareness
  • 1st Grade Library

    The Lower School Library provides resources that support the Lower School curriculum. Library services are also designed to encourage a passion for reading in each and every student.
    Lesson Topics & Skills:
    • Orientation
    • Library citizenship
    • Book care
    • Literature appreciation/response
    • Authors and illustrators
    • Self-selection of appropriate materials
    • Who Makes a Book? Author, Illustrator, Publisher ABC order
    • Alphabetizing
    • Spine labels
    • Basic organization of a library
    • Location Skills: Everybody books, headers
    • Fiction and Non-Fiction
    • Non-Fiction as source of information
  • 2nd Grade Library

    The Lower School Library provides resources that support the Lower School curriculum. Library services are also designed to encourage a passion for reading in each and every student.
    Lesson Topics & Skills:
    • Orientation
    • Library citizenship
    • Book care
    • Literature appreciation/response
    • Authors and illustrators
    • Self-selection of appropriate materials
    • Location Skills: Everybody books, Non-Fiction, Easy Chapter Books, Biography
    • Biography/Autobiography
    • Parts of a Book: Contents, Chapters, Glossary, Index
    • Introduction to online catalog
    • Basic Bibliography: Author, Title, Publication Date
  • 3rd Grade Library & Research

    The Lower School Library provides resources that support the Lower School curriculum. Library services are also designed to encourage a passion for reading in each and every student.
    Lesson Topics & Skills:
    • Orientation
    • Library citizenship
    • Book care
    • Literature appreciation/response
    • Authors and illustrators
    • Self-selection of appropriate materials
    • Parts of a Book
    • Location Skills: Spine labels
    • Dictionaries: ABC order, Guide words, Definitions
    • Genre study
    • Basic elements of research
    • Using the online catalog
    • Basic Bibliography: Author, Title, Publisher, Publication Date
  • 4th Grade Library & Research

    The Lower School Library provides resources that support the Lower School curriculum. Library services are also designed to encourage a passion for reading in each and every student.
    Lesson Topics & Skills:
    • Orientation    
    • Library citizenship         
    • Book care       
    • Literature appreciation/response 
    • Authors and illustrators 
    • Self-selection of Appropriate Materials
    • Genre study   
    • Bibliography: Noodletools            
    • Note-taking   
    • Plagiarism and How to Avoid It    
    • Dewey Decimal System
    • Using online catalog
    • Using online databases    
    • Developing research questions     
    • Online and database research techniques
  • 5th Grade Library & Research

    The Lower School Library provides resources that support the Lower School curriculum. Library services are also designed to encourage a passion for reading in each and every student.
    Lesson Topics & Skills:
    • Orientation    
    • Library citizenship         
    • Book care       
    • Literature appreciation/response
    • Authors and illustrators 
    • Understanding author's purpose
    • Self-selection of appropriate materials
    • Bibliography: Noodletools             
    • Using online catalog      
    • Using online databases 
    • Internet safety               
    • Website evaluation techniques    
    • Developing research questions and subquestions
    • Developing interview questions      
    • Note-taking   
    • Selection and organization of relevant information    
    • Analysis of multiple sources on one topic
    • Copyright and plagiarism
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